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We have been working with LIBS since 1998. In other words, we love to talk about LIBS. Ask away!

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Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

  • LIBS requires very little sample preparation.

  • It is relatively non-destructive.

  • You can use it to quickly and easily identify the chemical composition of a sample.

How does LIBS Work?

LIBS requires very little sample preparation compared to many other spectroscopic methods. Furthermore, samples can be analyzed in the form of solids, liquids, and gases.

First the sample is placed in the LIBS system. After that, a powerful pulsed laser ablates and excites the sample. During this process, less than a milligram of the sample’s particles from the ablation turns into a plasma. As a result, the light from that excited, ablated sample emits unique spectral signatures.

These spectral signatures are collected by the LIBS system and are subsequently analyzed using a series of software algorithms and LIBS elemental libraries. In other words, the software matches the spectral signature captured with the libraries to determine all the chemical elements present within the sample. LIBS can find help you identify the composition of the sample when 

For instance, our partners at AtomTrace created this beautiful and interactive Elements Database. From there, you can see the emission spectra data for a number of elements. This library works alongside their LIBS analysis software called AtomAnalyzer. 

 

LIBS Applications?

LIBS can be used for depth profiling materials, elemental surface mapping, and bulk property analysis. For example, LIBS technology can be used to determine the heating value and ash content in coal.

AtomTrace also created a wonderful database of LIBS Research Papers. From there, you can look up many other examples of LIBS in action.

We sell LIBS Systems from AtomTrace, SPECTRAL Industries, and TSI.